October 26th, 2011

Recommended Reading #70: Politics, Pt. II



      “Abstinence Sex Ed? ‘I’m Baaack…'” by Dr. Marty Klein (Youth, Sexuality Education, United States Public Policy, Sex and Culture, Psychology, Self-Awareness) 10/7/11

I personally find it so important to recognize that adults who appear so fearful of and/or opposed to minors’ exposure to information about sex tend to feel (directly proportionately, I would presume) fearful of/uncomfortable with sexuality themselves. In this way, the further deprivation of youth from information about sexuality is perpetrating a cycle, in this case of fear, ignorance, and inauthenticity. I appreciate voices like Dr. Klein’s continuously pointing this out and support us all in recognizing this and addressing and being with our own discomforts for the service of higher consciousness for all humanity.

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      “The Hot Topic, vol. 12: The Elephant in the Bedroom” by Lana Fox (Sex and Culture, Sexual Orientation, Sexual Identity) 10/11/11

I have admittedly been known to feel amazement when I have encountered individuals whom I have experienced as not appearing aware of or finding important the realm of social issues related to or centered around sexuality to which I have devoted so much time and attention. However, I have indeed encountered such perspectives, and after the initial surprise I’ve felt (resultant of the relative normativeness of discussing and considering sexuality I have experienced for years), the prevalence thereof does make sense to me given the lack of openness I experience this culture as showing around sexuality. I appreciate this column from Lana expressing her view of the importance of what she refers to as sexual politics.

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      “Panic of the Plutocrats” by Paul Krugman (Non-sex-related, Economics, United States Public Policy, Activism) 10/9/11

I have often appreciated Mr. Krugman’s commentary in the New York Times, where he is a columnist. This piece strikes me as intensely exquisite, outlining clearly, straightforwardly, and eloquently something that has seemed vaguely obvious to me but that I would not have known how to express quite so beautifully. I have often found Mr. Krugman’s commentary to do exactly that, and I find solace in knowing he has such a platform via which to offer such things.

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Recommended Reading posted every Wednesday

7 Responses “Recommended Reading #70: Politics, Pt. II”

  1. Lana Fox says:

    Em, thank you so much for this! I am truly touched, and I don’t know what we’d do without you. xoxoxo

  2. ste says:

    hi Emerald

    I forget to read Krugman’s column very often… but then I read something like that I wonder why I don’t look him up regularly.

    Sometimes, reading the state of things express so clearly is quite depressing.

  3. Emerald says:

    Thank you, Lana! I really liked your post. Thanks for coming by! :) Xoxo

  4. Emerald says:

    Ste! So lovely to see you.

    Yes, I know what you mean. I used to read the New York Times Op-Ed page regularly, and I almost always vastly appreciated what Krugman had to say. In recent years I have consciously avoided exposure to the news as much, but I felt that familiar zing of grateful (possibly a bit self-righteous ;)) energy when I read that piece. Fabulous.

    And yes, I also know what you mean re your last comment—the aforementioned avoidance of the news has something to do with that….

    Thanks for stopping by—be well! :)

  5. ste says:

    hi Emerald

    I don’t blame you sometimes! But I think what’s most depressing is reading someone like Krugman talking such common sense… and then turning on the news and hearing whatever the powers that be are spouting this week… and realising just how large the gap between the two things is.

  6. Emerald says:

    Good point, ste. I have experienced similar sentiments.

    Am taking a deep, conscious breath. :) Thanks again for being here—for some reason seeing a comment from you has almost always made me smile. :)

  7. ste says:

    what a lovely thing to say, Emerald!

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